How to Exfoliate Legs Safely with Store

Summer is the season where you ditch the tights, reveal your legs and potentially start questioning whether you were birthed by a lizard.

The dry, rough skin that was easy to ignore in winter is now there blinking at you, displaying cracks like a farmer’s field mid-drought.

I’ve always had fairly dry skin and used to find that a daily slick of body lotion was enough to keep the scales at bay.

However, in recent years I’ve noticed that my legs have been getting thirstier than ex-Love Island contestants commenting on each other’s Instagrams.

Turns out that skin gets drier the older we get – but why?

‘Put simply, the skin gets thinner, natural oil production reduces, the concentration of natural moisturising factors (NMFs) in the skin, such as urea, reduce as we age, and the skin becomes less resilient to what the environment throws at it,’ Dr. Mark J. Hudson-Peacock, Consultant Dermatologist at The Canterbury Skin and Laser Clinic tells Metro.co.uk.

‘The lower legs are particularly prone to these effects, partly due to its thinner quality and reduced production of natural oils there: sebaceous glands are larger and most numerous on the face and upper body, getting less productive the further peripherally one goes down the arms and down the legs in particular.

‘Skin can also look dry because the outer skin cells do not separate so readily anymore.’

Dr Hudson-Peacock reveals there is ‘little evidence’ that drinking more water or ‘taking supplements over and above a good, balanced, healthy diet’ makes any discernible difference to skin hydration.

Luckily, the right skincare regime (yes, regime, it’s that serious) can help us, so here’s a suggestion of where to start.

how to remove dry skin from legs

Exfoliating the legs is a quick, easy way to get smooth, even-looking skin. You can use a loofah, towel, brush, exfoliating scrub, or chemical exfoliant. Always be careful not to over-exfoliate, as this can irritate your skin and potentially damage the skin barrier.

Leg exfoliator brush or sponge

Leg exfoliator brushes or sponges have a rough texture that removes dead skin as you scrub. Dry brushing is when you use the brush or sponge on dry skin. In addition to exfoliating, dry brushing can also improve circulation, reduce the appearance of cellulite, and may help remove toxins through the lymphatic system.

Other brushes can be used on damp skin with your normal bodywash. There are also exfoliating gloves that are easy to grip and convenient to use in the shower.

Exfoliating scrubs

Exfoliating scrubs contain granular beads that exfoliate the skin. You can gently apply the scrub in a circular motion on the legs, which will buff off dead skin and leave your legs soft to the touch.

Make sure your scrub doesn’t contain plastic microbeads, which can be abrasive to the skin and bad for the environment once they wash down the drain. In fact, some states have even banned these products.

Sugar or another natural granular texture is a better option — just don’t use a sugar scrub on your face, where your skin is thinner and it can do more harm than good.

Allergic dermatitis

Allergic dermatitis happens when skin comes into contact with a substance that triggers the immune system to overreact. On the legs, this could be a body wash, something from the outdoors, pets, or anything that causes an allergic reaction.

For some, the reaction can mean dry, cracked, or scaly skin.

Eczema is a skin condition that’s thought to be linked to genetics and triggered by the immune system. It can cause skin to be red, dry, itchy, or to develop a rash.

While it can appear anywhere on the body, eczema is commonly seen on the legs. For example, patches might develop behind the knees.

Psoriasis is an autoimmune condition that causes the skin to produce too many skin cells at once. The buildup creates itchy, scaly patches that can also crack and bleed.

It’s common to find psoriasis patches on the knees.

Weather changes

Many people notice an increase in dry skin during certain times of the year, like when it starts to get cold outside. Lower humidity in the air (which typically happens during winter) can also increase the chances for skin becoming dry.

Research in 2016 suggests that the way skin reacts when exposed to the cold may be related to developing dry skin.

The study examined the length of time it took skin to return to its normal temperature after being exposed to the cold and found a connection with longer recovery time and dry skin symptoms.

In this Article

Exfoliation is when you remove dead skin buildup, which stimulates new cell growth. Exfoliating your legs can make them look smoother and more polished, and give them a glow.

When exfoliating your legs, do it safely. Exfoliating too often or too hard can cause redness or even damage your skin. Consider your skin type before exfoliating. Common skin types include:

  • Sensitive skin, which may be prone to stinging or burning after exfoliation
  • Normal skin, which is clear and not sensitive
  • Dry skin, which can be flaky, itchy, or rough
  • The two types of at-home exfoliation methods are known as physical and chemical exfoliation. Physical exfoliation uses a tool like a brush or sponge to scrub away the dry surface. Chemical exfoliation uses chemicals like gentle acids to dissolve dead skin.

    Christmas

    NEWS… BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT

    how to remove dry skin from legs

    Summer is the season where you ditch the tights, reveal your legs and potentially start questioning whether you were birthed by a lizard.

    The dry, rough skin that was easy to ignore in winter is now there blinking at you, displaying cracks like a farmer’s field mid-drought.

    I’ve always had fairly dry skin and used to find that a daily slick of body lotion was enough to keep the scales at bay.

    However, in recent years I’ve noticed that my legs have been getting thirstier than ex-Love Island contestants commenting on each other’s Instagrams.

    Turns out that skin gets drier the older we get – but why?

    ‘Put simply, the skin gets thinner, natural oil production reduces, the concentration of natural moisturising factors (NMFs) in the skin, such as urea, reduce as we age, and the skin becomes less resilient to what the environment throws at it,’ Dr. Mark J. Hudson-Peacock, Consultant Dermatologist at The Canterbury Skin and Laser Clinic tells Metro.co.uk.

    ‘The lower legs are particularly prone to these effects, partly due to its thinner quality and reduced production of natural oils there: sebaceous glands are larger and most numerous on the face and upper body, getting less productive the further peripherally one goes down the arms and down the legs in particular.

    ‘Skin can also look dry because the outer skin cells do not separate so readily anymore.’

    Dr Hudson-Peacock reveals there is ‘little evidence’ that drinking more water or ‘taking supplements over and above a good, balanced, healthy diet’ makes any discernible difference to skin hydration.

    Luckily, the right skincare regime (yes, regime, it’s that serious) can help us, so here’s a suggestion of where to start.

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